Sunday, December 22, 2013

Quisling AstroTurf Groups Like E4E and Teach Plus Reality Distortion

 ...the views of most early career teachers differ from those of many veteran teachers. As a national survey conducted by Teach Plus in 2012 found, early career teachers are more likely than their veteran peers to strongly support rigorous evaluations, performance-based compensation, and inclusion of student growth measures in teacher evaluations..... Balderdash from ed deform astroturf orgs.
NYC has been inundated by early career teachers over the 12 years of Bloomberg. Are they shouting about supporting ed deform crapola other than the few in E4E which despite enormous funding with full-time organizers can't gain much traction while MORE begins to attract teachers who decide to remain in the system once they get tenure and finish their grad studies?

I would say that most MOREistas have only been teaching under Bloomberg. In fact looking at the 11 new MORE steering committee taking office this week and the 10 people on the outgoing committee about half are in the relative newbie category. But I guess we can classify a veteran teacher nowadays at about 4 or 5 years.

The people in MORE vs the temps who join E4E is a counter-sign to their claims. They don't seem to have the nerve to test out their polls by actually running in a union election to see just how they would fare.

The fact that they are trying to claim union Quislings like Randi are out of touch because they fight ed deform is laughable. The very rise of MORE and CORE and NEW Caucus and lots more are due to Weingarten and her brethren doing the very opposite of fighting ed deform (see my follow-up piece on Randi whining about being stabbed in the back by her pal Cami Anderson in Newark -- and see Christie's response which will give you a laugh.

Just watch the next few years and see whether I or Teach Plus is right about where the new generation of teachers will stand once they get a few years in the classroom under their belts.


sellout 3
The Teacher “Union” Problem Within As teacher unions step up their calls to stop the “corporate agenda” in education and to confront the “privatization” movement, there is a far more real and serious threat facing teacher unions. The threat comes not from billionaires or charter schools or philanthropists. Rather, it comes from many teacher unions’ difficulty to modernize and reshape themselves in the midst of profound demographic changes of their members. At stake are the relevance and even existence of teacher unions–a force that historically has played such a vital role in American public school education.

Three basic demographic facts of today’s public school teachers should give teacher unions long pause before continuing to support policies that appeal primarily to a shrinking base of veteran teachers: 1) 52% of U.S. public school teachers have fewer than 10 years of experience (up from 25% in the 1980′s); 2) Approximately one million (or about 30%) of all U.S. public school teachers are expected to retire in the next five years; and 3) Today, there are more first year teachers in American classrooms than there are teachers at any other experience level.

As significantly, the views of most early career teachers differ from those of many veteran teachers. As a national survey conducted by Teach Plus in 2012 found, early career teachers are more likely than their veteran peers to strongly support rigorous evaluations, performance-based compensation, and inclusion of student growth measures in teacher evaluations  http://www.teachplus.org/page/newsroom-6/news/december-2013-342.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter+December+2013&utm_content=Newsletter+December+2013+CID_db0b06033f284dd40592acc2e0299360&utm_source=Campaign%20Monitor&utm_term=Read%20more

No comments:

Post a Comment

Comments are welcome. Irrelevant and abusive comments will be deleted, as will all commercial links. Comment moderation is on, so if your comment does not appear it is because I have not been at my computer (I do not do cell phone moderating).