Friday, January 31, 2014

The Battle for NYSUT: Ebbs and Flows

We have reports that a 100 locals have signed on to the Iannuzzi slate. You can track what is going on at their site - NYSUT - STRONGER TOGETHER - Home.

While Phil Rumore's Buffalo may be leaning away from Iannuzzi, the article below show the other 3 cities -- Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers may be on the fence.

The bigger issue is whether a true resistance to a Mulgrew dominated NYSUT will grow out of this struggle no matter the result. Signs are pointing that way.
American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten, who headed New York City's teachers' union before taking the national post, wouldn't take sides when confronted by reporters at a labor rally in Albany Wednesday. But she said she was disappointed by the rhetoric of the race, which has turned nasty. (See Iannuzzi and Pallotta's fight over a table at Governor Andrew Cuomo's Billy Joel-headlined bęrthday fund-raiser.)
“We have had state elections like this throughout the country—in Minnesota, in Florida, in West Virginia, in New Mexico—that have never gotten as divisive as this one,” she said..... CapitalNY
While some think Randi must be behind the move of the UFT to take over NYSUT completely and totally (they pretty much have a lot of control now) this doesn't have her fingerprints. What does she have to gain from trying to push out Iannuzzi - who she helped put in? Or pushing out Maria Neira who she promoted from the UFT Exec Bd to a NYSUT VP?

People are pissed and to me it seems the pro-Iannuzzi are more pissed (I call them the real insurgents) and most likely to go rogue after the election.
A source who attended the reception said it seemed like there was a line down the middle of the room separating the supporters and challengers of the current administration, with Pallotta floating between the groups. An similar scene followed Tuesday morning at a reportedly awkward breakfast hosted by New York City's United Federation of Teachers.
Here is some new news from the same source about the other big cities and it looks like they are ęn the fence - no matter how they vote if they are unhappy now watch them wee


Yonkers Federation of Teachers president Patricia Puleo said her union's delegates are free to decide for themselves who they'll vote for in April, and she questioned whether new leadership would make a difference in how the state Education Department goes forward with implementation of the Common Core standards. But she recognized that the city's teachers have grown frustrated.
“People are so upset that they are willing to make whatever changes they can,” Puleo said.
Kevin Ahern, president of the Syracuse Teachers Association, said his delegates aren't sure how they'll vote.
“We have to do what is best for our local, and we are waiting until we have thoroughly discussed where both slates are at in terms of what will work best for us in the long term,” Ahern said.
Rochester Teachers Association president Adam Urbanski said teachers have been dissatisfied with Iannuzzi's handling of some issues in the past, they “have also noted a marked change in his position with the call for a moratorium and with spearheading the vote of no confidence against Commissioner King,” he said.
“I think there is considerable dissatisfaction with the way things have turned out,” Urbanski continued, “and I think they want a stronger position to be taken by NYSUT than NYSUT has managed to take until now. There is absolutely no question about that. But they don't want change for the sake of change; they want change in position and the issues to be the focus point, not personalities.”
Read the entire piece here:
http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2014/01/8539552/nysut-president-loses-ground-divisive-election-nears

Read and download the MORE newsletter issue #2.
Print a few copies for your colleagues.

1 comment:

  1. Excellent forwarding
    Yonkers Federation of Teachers president Patricia Puleo said her union's delegates are free to decide for themselves who they'll vote for in April, and she questioned whether new leadership would make a difference in how the state Education Department goes forward with implementation of the Common Core standards. But she recognized that the city's teachers have grown frustrated.
    “People are so upset that they are willing to make whatever changes they can,” Puleo said.
    Kevin Ahern, president of the Syracuse Teachers Association, said his delegates aren't sure how they'll vote.
    “We have to do what is best for our local, and we are waiting until we have thoroughly discussed where both slates are at in terms of what will work best for us in the long term,” Ahern said.
    Thanks a lot with great wishing

    ReplyDelete

Comments are welcome. Irrelevant and abusive comments will be deleted, as will all commercial links. Comment moderation is on, so if your comment does not appear it is because I have not been at my computer (I do not do cell phone moderating).