Sunday, January 27, 2013

Eva Violation: Using Parents of Success Cheater Schools Funded With Public Money for Political Operation

The Success Charter outrages continue. It is time to call for an investigation of the use of schools to create a political operation. If they were private without feeding at the public trough, gey gezunt. But not with OUR money. Imagine if a public school principal organized parents to picket mayoral candidates and used school resources to do so. Of course they won't be picketing Christine Quinn I guess. And where is the UFT on this one?
Parents,
Last week the teachers union and several mayoral candidates called for a halt on all co-locations.  As you know, we depend on underutilized space in public school buildings to educate your child.  As your children grow and their younger siblings start school, we are going to need more space.  Without co-location, we won't be able to get it.  


This opposition to co-location is not about doing what is best for children.  It is about trying to please the teachers union.  Please take a look at the following link to learn more: http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/mr-mulgrew-pupils-article-1.1247
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We can't let this happen.  We must take a stand.  On Thursday morning, parents from several of our schools in Harlem will be picketing outside the offices of the mayoral candidates who came out against co-location.  If you are interested in joining them, please contact Norah Cooney at norah.cooney@successacademies.org for more information. 
We are going to need all of our parents to show up for similar events in the future.  This fight is just beginning, and we will need your help!  It's time that mayoral candidates start listening to what parents want, and together we can make that happen. 

Warmly,
Eva Moskowitz

4 comments:

  1. Eva, "Evil" Moskowitz is a total hack, and deep inside she knows that all she cares about is making a buck off of education. I am so happy that the ed-deform movement is finally starting to die out. Charter schools, vouchers, constant testing etc., are all finally being fought tooth and nail by the general public. Just like the housing debacle from a few years back, the corporate goons will have to find a new area to loot and pillage from. Get ready to say bye-bye to these leeches.

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  2. Dear Anonymous,

    While I agree with you that factions are growing throughout the country and are fighting back against ed deform, I will also propose to you and Norm's readers that the fight is hardly over. . .. it's just begun, and it will get far worse before it gets better, assuming it will get better.

    The reformers have enormous amount of resources to get their way, everything from campaign finance to ads on television.

    I hope with all my might and all my protesting efforts that you are right, but for now, may I advise you and all others that we can hardly fall asleep right now or relax. The one thing we must all remember is to never underestimate the power of our opponent. Now is the time to continue to fight as though your life - and your democracy - depend on it.

    Go ask Byran Jones or Julie Kavanaugh of MORE. They'll probably corroborate my sentiment.

    Hawkishly,
    Robert Rendo
    http://thetruthoneducationreform.blogspot.com/?view=snapshot

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  3. Robert, I agree with you that the fight is hardly over. However, my belief is that the ed-deform movement is staring to "plateau" right now. Parents are starting to opt out of high stakes testing, teachers unions are finally starting to question their leaders, and even many administrators are starting to speak out against all of the nonsense involved in the ed-deform debate. Yes, we have a long way to go, but I really do think that the corporate goons who want to make a buck off education are starting to see that this fight might not be worth the long term hassle in the long run. After all, the corporate business model states that one should try to make as much money as quick as possible. However, there are way too many teachers and parents who are very vested in the long term who will stay and fight these goons to the bitter end. I think that the ed-deform folks will eventually move on to a more profitable area where they will face less opposition. (Prisons, mental health, the military perhaps)

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  4. I concur!

    We need all of these epicenters to spread their cracks and vaults so that all connect in one behemoth earthquake of a national consensus. Then there must be political backlash from voters and their part in getting officials into power. I am a nationally board certified teacher, and I teach low income English language learners, and between the computerized reading assessment we are forced to use by NYSED (our districts can no longer choose their own local assessments, but must pick one of five products from the state) the NYSESLAT, and the student learning objectives I must now sign off on (they are literally a guarantee of percentages of one's students who must make a certain score), I have been telling my wife (a public school teacher) and colleagues that my days are increasingly numbered. I have a proven track record of performance, and my disctrict and I get along very well, but the new system and how it's designed to measure my effectiveness is such junk science that many dedicated and effective teachers stand to become casualties in the next 5 years. . . . . It will be interesting to see how this whole thing plays out.

    Perhaps our one year sunset clause will add some justice-ridden protection against this insane movement.

    BTW, I passed my observation with high scores for APPR, but the tests used now are so questionable (putting 4 and 5 year old immigrant children on computers to take a reading test when all they do is click away to finish as quickly as possible because the program offers a mindless video game if they complete the first of two tests . . . ) that who knows where I will end up on the evaluation HEDI spectrum.

    So, the backlash is growing, but I know I don't speak for myself in terms of the number of "employment fatalities" that will occur. As a tax cap implodes our yearly budget, there will be much incentive for districts to purge themselves of more veteran, experienced, and effective teachers.

    Am I waxing pessimistic and carmudgeonly?

    Thank you for your reply, Anonymous.

    Sincerely,
    Robert Rendo
    http://thetruthoneducationreform.blogspot.com/?view=snapshot


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